Posts Tagged “Spain”

Dubai Health Authority to form committee for organ transplantation

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Dubai Health Authority to form committee for organ transplantation

The Dubai Health Authority, United Arab Emirates, is in the process of forming a local committee to regulate the transport and transplantation of organs and tissues in Dubai.

The committee will be responsible for standardising and regulating the process of organ transplantation in accordance with the regulations and provisions stipulated in Federal Law No. 05 of 2016 on regulating the transfer and transplantation of organs and tissues.

DHA hosted a workshop to share experiences and learn about the best practices and latest developments in organ transplantation.

The workshop was held with the participation of the National Committee for Organ Transplantation, chaired by Dr Ali Abdulkarim Al Obeidli and attended by representatives of the Donation and Transplantation Institute in Barcelona – Spain, headed by Professor Francesco Procaccio on Tuesday, 6th November in Rashid Hospital.

Dr Marwan Al Mulla, CEO of the Health Regulation Sector at the DHA praised the efforts of all relevant health authorities that working on preparing a comprehensive national programme for organ donation and transplantation. He said that producing the comprehensive programme will relieve the pain of patients and reduce the burden on the health sector, especially when it comes to chronic cases that will be treated according…

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USA: proposals on International Reference Pricing based on EU experience

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USA: proposals on International Reference Pricing based on EU experience

President Trump has had big pharma in his sights for some time. As his presidency continues, more has emerged about the administrations plans to tackle an industry that Trump has suggested has gotten away with murder. The latest proposals — an International Pricing Index — amount to international reference pricing (IRP). IRP is something that countries in Europe have been doing for years, so what lessons are there?

US international reference pricing proposals

Trump announced in October 2018 that Medicare could pay for some prescription drugs based on prices paid in other industrialized countries. Trump is credited with pointing out that basing prices to be paid via a state funded purchaser would be “revolutionary”. That’s not the case, with European countries using the prices paid by their peers for years, although the moniker used to describe it can vary, popular is using the moniker External Reference Pricing (ERP).

For US IRP, a demonstration project will be run through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, created under the Affordable Care Act. The Trump proposals are not going to take effect until late 2019, or early 2020.

While the full details aren’t yet agreed – there is a window of time allowing people…

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Winners and Losers in future life expectancy estimates – Spain and Portugal win, Canada and Norway lose

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Winners and Losers in future life expectancy estimates – Spain and Portugal win, Canada and Norway lose

Life expectancy in 2040 is set to rise at least a little in all nations but the rankings will change dramatically, with Spain taking the top spot while China and the United States trade places, researchers said Wednesday.

With a projected average lifespan of nearly 85.8 years, Spain — formerly in 4th place — will dethrone Japan, which sits atop the rankings today with a lifespan of 83.7 years, and will drop to 2nd place in 2040.

Saudi Arabia are among the nations that are moving up the ranking — Indonesia (117th to 100th), Nigeria (157th to 123rd), Portugal (23rd to 5th), Poland (48th to 34th), Turkey (40th to 26th), Saudi Arabia (61st to 43rd).

In a shift that will be seen by some to reflect a superpower changing-of-the-guard, the world’s two largest economies effectively swap positions compared to 2016: in 2040 the US drops from 43rd to 64th (79.8 years), while China rises from 68th to 39th (81.9 years).

The researchers found other nations set to lose ground in the race towards longevity include Canada (from 17th to 27th), Norway (12th to 20th), Australia (5th to 10th), Mexico (69th to 87th), Taiwan (35th to 42nd) and North Korea 125th…

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By 2040, Diabetes will be the leading cause of mortality in South Africa

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By 2040, Diabetes will be the leading cause of mortality in South Africa

South Africans are likely to live, on average, seven years longer in 2040 than they do now, but the country will see only modest improvement in its global ranking as longevity increases worldwide, according to a study published in the Lancet.

SA had an average life expectancy of 62.4 years in 2016, and ranked 171 among 195 countries. If recent health trends continue, SA could see life expectancy increasing to 69.3 years. But it will only rise two places in the global rankings, to 169, as life expectancy is expected to increase in most countries.

Spain is expected to rank first in 2040, with an average lifespan of 85.8 years, followed by Japan with life expectancy of 83.7 years.

The authors of the study forecast a range of scenarios for each country, which for SA show that life expectancy could increase by as much as 12.9 years to 75.3 years if the country stepped up its efforts to improve the health of the nation. But in the worst-case scenario, life expectancy could fall by as much as 8.1 years.

“The main message here is that our health is not preordained. With the [right intervention] our health can improve; if not,…

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Policy coherence and uniformity across Europe will support future generic pharma growth

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Policy coherence and uniformity across Europe will support future generic pharma growth

Europe needs a uniform policy to help realise the full potential of the continent’s emerging generic pharmaceuticals market, according to a new report from global research and consulting firm Frost & Sullivan.

Its report – Emerging Generic Pharmaceuticals Markets in Europe – focuses on the key factors promoting growth in the sector, the factor restraining its development and revenue forecasts. Special consideration is given to the generic pharmaceuticals markets in Italy, Portugal, Spain and France.

Concerned by the rising cost of pharmaceutical products, government and healthcare authorities in Europe are increasingly promoting the use of generics over high-priced originator drugs, reveals the report. The strategy is designed to help countries make the most of their constrained healthcare budgets.

Pricing and reimbursement policies 

But pricing and reimbursement policies in Europe are complex; with each country implementing its own set of policies to govern the generics sector. This is leading to uneven penetration of generics products.

In fact, the lack of coherent reimbursement and substitution policies across Europe were delaying the launch and uptake of generics, the report claims. To combat the challenge a Europe-wide policy should be adopted.

“A coherent and uniform generics policy should be implemented across all European countries,”…

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Is Europe Creating a Coalition to Combat Big Pharma?

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Is Europe Creating a Coalition to Combat Big Pharma?

The late-June announcement that Ireland is joining the Beneluxa Initiative on Pharmaceutical Policy might suggest renewed vigour for the drive to equip national governments with more clout in their pricing negotiations with international drug firms. The Irish Minister for Health, Simon Harris, signed an agreement on June 22 with his counterparts from Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Austria, the current members of this collaborative alliance, set up three years ago with the explicit aim of gaining strength in numbers to tackle the demands of pharmaceutical firms when setting prices, particularly for innovative medicines. There is no ambiguity in the primary Beneluxa objectives. Dutch health minister Bruno Bruins reiterated them clearly at the signing ceremony: “By joining forces we improve our mutual position in price negotiations towards the pharmaceutical industry and we have a stronger voice at European level”, he said. “In this way we can ensure that our patients can count on access to affordable, innovative medicines in the long term”. And Belgian health minister Maggie De Block added: “Four years ago, each country still worked on its own. Today, we are five countries joining forces.” Harris echoed their views: this collaboration will assist Ireland “by ensuring that medicines can…

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Price pressure keeps nine new drugs from Irish patients

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Price pressure keeps nine new drugs from Irish patients

Irish patients are being denied access to nine drugs that are widely available across Europe, largely on cost grounds.

The drugs – most of them cancer therapies – have gone through the Health Technology Assessment, which examines the clinical effectiveness and safety of new drugs as well as their cost-effectiveness and budget impact.

However, they are still not approved for patients by the HSE. On average, the nine drugs have been waiting for two years on a decision from the HSE as to whether it will pay for them, an industry group says.

The therapies are listed on a new quarterly monitor issued by the Irish Pharmaceutical Healthcare Association (Ipha), which represents pharmaceutical manufacturers.

It reports on drugs that are stuck in the system and also those that have been approved. This initial report says that seven new therapies have been approved by the State so far this year. They include MSD’s cancer drug Keytruda and GlaxoSmithKline’s Nucala, which treats severe asthma.

Among the drugs still waiting for approval are Pfizer’s breast cancer drug ibrance and Spinraza, a Biogen drug for the rare genetic disease, spinal muscular atrophy.

Apart from Spinraza, six of the drugs on the list are cancer…

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The availability of orphan medicines varies from country-to-country, says new European study

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The availability of orphan medicines varies from country-to-country, says new European study

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland, published in the European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, has highlighted that there are differences in the availability of orphan medicines between different European countries.

Orphan medicines are those developed specifically for the treatment, prevention or diagnostics of rare diseases, which are considered to be life-threatening or permanently disabling medical conditions that affect less than 5 in 10,000 of the general population.

This study, which was conducted in April 2016 via a survey sent to the members of a network of authorities dealing with pharmaceutical product pricing and reimbursement in Europe, focused on the availability and distribution channels of 10 orphan medicines used in outpatient care in 24 European countries.

On average, half of the medicines were available on the markets, but there was variation when looking at each country individually. All 10 medicines were only available in three of the countries included in the study — the Netherlands, Malta and Poland. Five to nine medicines were available in 10 countries: Austria, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Norway, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Four countries, namely Latvia, Lithuania, Turkey and Belarus, did not have any of the medicines studied available.

Typically, rare medicines…

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Better outcomes for all: can new pricing models transform European patient care?

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Better outcomes for all: can new pricing models transform European patient care?

I am extremely excited by the promise of medical innovation. From across the life sciences sector we are seeing life changing, even life-saving, cutting-edge science being translated into real, tangible, often transformational outcomes for patients, for society, and for how we manage our healthcare.

Different therapies, including combination therapies, cell therapy, and gene editing, are making the previously untreatable, treatable, or even curable. This genuine, palpable excitement over the science and its potential for patients is often twinned with legitimate concerns about affordability and access.

Our health systems are facing unprecedented challenges from an ageing population and the increasing prevalence of chronic disease. To be very clear, it is the rising demand for healthcare services that is driving healthcare costs, and not the price of medicines. In fact, the latest independent data indicates that “over the next five years, net brand spending [on medicines] will remain flat, despite the expected entry of new, branded medicines; the overall impact on payers being the same in 2022 for brands as in 2017.” Medicines will be delivering more for less.

Even having established that the price of new medicines will not be the principle driver of healthcare costs, rising demand for healthcare means…

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Canada Releases Proposed Amendments To Regulations Governing Patented Medicines Pricing – Intellectual Property – Canada

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On December 2, 2017 Canada’s Governor-in-Council published proposed Regulations Amending the Patented Medicines Regulations (“the proposed Regulations”). The 75-day consultation period ends February 15, 2018. The proposed coming into force date is January 1, 2019. This follows the release of a consultation document in May 2017.

The proposed Regulations represent a significant overhaul to the Patented Medicines Regulations and are estimated by Health Canada to result in savings of $12.6 billion net present value over 10 years. While still yet to be adopted, in order to be prepared, companies should be factoring these potential changes into their business planning now.

Together with the Patent Act (sections 79-103), the Patented Medicines Regulations provide the framework and authority by which the Government of Canada, through the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (“PMPRB”), regulates the prices of patented medicines in Canada to avoid excessive prices. The regulatory framework is supplemented by the Compendium of Policies, Guidelines and Procedures, which explains the policies and procedures that the PMPRB normally applies in reviewing the prices of patented medicines sold in Canada.

Section 85 of the Patent Act lists the factors that the PMPRB must take into account in determining if a medicine has been sold at an excessive price, including such factors as specified in the Patented Medicines Regulations.

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