Posts Tagged “Multiple sclerosis”

MoH UAE unveils smart application for AI-based remote patient monitoring

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MoH UAE unveils smart application for AI-based remote patient monitoring

DUBAI: The Ministry of Health and Prevention (MoHAP) has unveiled the smart application “Medopad” for remotely monitoring the body’s vital signs in accordance with Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies, during its participation at Arab Health 2019.

The application aims to analyse patient’s information and generate predictive insights which will be able to detect life threatening medical conditions.

Medopad application, which has been tailored according to patients’ needs, collects data through devices connected to the platform and supports self-management through dashboard available on both IOS and Android systems. Thus, the application tracks the most important daily activities of the user, so that the medical care teams will be able to provide better care that suits every person by remotely analysing, reviewing and documenting patients’ data and information.

Medopad also has a wide range of educational and awareness content to assist patients including a wide spectrum of rare and complicated diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis M.S., kidney and heart diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Parkinson’s disease, pre and post-operative care and others diseases.

Commenting on the launching of the application, Dr. Youssif Al Serkal, Assistant Under-Secretary for the Ministry’s Hospitals Sector, underscored the importance of adopting this technology in light of the…

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Both parties want lower drug prices but gridlock prevents reform

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Both parties want lower drug prices but gridlock prevents reform

I went to Walgreens recently to pick up my three-month supply of a prescription I have been using for years. Ho hum. Until I saw what it was going to cost.

All of a sudden the price had gone up by more than 20 percent. I paid it, of course, grumbling. But I decided to do some research into what’s going on with America’s prescription drug prices.

Bloomberg News looked into drug prices last year and found that “255 brand name drugs had increases between Feb.1 and July 13 … the most common increase was for 9 to 10 percent.”

It also tracked the prices for 40 commonly used drugs in six categories — diabetes, cancer, HIV, multiple sclerosis, asthma and chronic pulmonary disease, and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis — over a three-year period from June 2015 to June 2018. During this period the consumer price index went up by 5.6 percent.

“For all six categories of drugs,” Bloomberg found, “list prices rose far faster than inflation.”

They report:

“Prices for 10 commonly used diabetes drugs rose 25.6 percent, on average, while average prices for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune treatments rose 40.1 percent. The latter category…

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Trump Proposals Could Increase Health Costs for Consumers

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Trump Proposals Could Increase Health Costs for Consumers

Consumers who use expensive brand-name prescription drugs when cheaper alternatives are available could face higher costs under a new policy being proposed by the Trump administration.

The proposal, to be published this week in the Federal Register, would apply to health insurance plans sold under the Affordable Care Act.

Health plans have annual limits on consumers’ out-of-pocket costs. Under the proposal, insurers would not have to count the full amount of a consumer’s co-payment for a brand-name drug toward the annual limit on cost-sharing. Insurers would have to count only the smaller amount that would be charged for a generic version of the drug.

For example, if a consumer filled a doctor’s prescription for a brand-name drug with a $25 co-payment, rather than using a generic medicine with a $5 co-payment, the consumer might get credit for only $5 in out-of-pocket spending. Consumers would have to spend more of their own money before reaching the annual limit on out-of-pocket costs.

In addition, insurers would not have to count the value of coupons and other financial assistance provided to consumers by drug manufacturers if generic alternatives were available. This change could significantly increase consumers’ out-of-pocket costs for some of the more…

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Iran: U.S. Sanctions resulting in patients unable to access medicines

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Iran: U.S. Sanctions resulting in patients unable to access medicines

The strain was evident in Alireza Karimi’s voice as he described his struggle to obtain the diazoxide pills his father needs to lower insulin levels and fight pancreatic cancer.

The medicine has to be imported, and until recently that was not a problem. But for the past three months, Mr. Karimi has not been able to find it anyplace, and there is now only one bottle left.

“Now that this medicine isn’t here, we’re forced to give him only one per day,” Mr. Karimi said in an interview over Telegram, a popular messaging app for Iranians. The reduced dosage has created complications, like the threat of convulsions and the need to monitor his father 24 hours a day to make sure his insulin levels do not spike, which could send him into a coma.

Anxieties over the availability of medicine are mounting in Iran with the reimposition this month of sanctions by the United States after President Trump withdrew from the nuclear deal.

Harsh banking restrictions and the threat of secondary sanctions for companies doing business with Iran have made it nearly impossible for foreign pharmaceutical companies to continue working in the country.

Trump administration officials say that the sanctions…

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Irish patients are not getting access to innovative medicines as quickly as their peers in other EU countries.

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Irish patients are not getting access to innovative medicines as quickly as their peers in other EU countries.

Much goes into making a medicine. The process requires innovation, creativity, perseverance, and huge investment.

There will be obstacles, expected and unforeseen, and lots of failures. It can take as much as 13 years, and cost about €2bn, to bring a new medicine to the market.

In the end, though, the risk will be worth it. Because we have the potential to help people live longer, healthier lives, and to discover tomorrow’s cures.

The pharmaceutical industry will look to make a commercial return on its investment. But affordability and innovation are not mutually exclusive.

A progressive approach to developing new medicines, and making them available to patients, recognises the risk and reward equation, and tries to balance it.

Pharmaceutical innovators have a major stake in Ireland’s future. Life expectancy here is rising faster than the European Union average. By 2030, one in six people will be over 65 and there will be twice as many people aged 85 and over.

By 2040, an extra million people will live here. As the population grows, changes, and ages, the role of innovation in meeting medical need becomes more vital.

Irish patients are not getting access to innovative medicines as quickly as their…

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Americans Fund Most of the World’s Drug Research. Here’s How Trump Can End That

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Americans Fund Most of the World’s Drug Research. Here’s How Trump Can End That

President Donald Trump recently released an ambitious, 44-page plan to drive down prescription drug prices. The blueprint relies, in part, on negotiating and enforcing trade deals to prevent other countries from freeloading off of American researchers.

That’s a smart strategy. Right now, most of our trading partners impose government price controls on drugs. Ensuring that these nations pay fair market value for medicines would spur additional research spending by U.S. drugmakers. Ultimately, this process would lead to more new drugs, forcing manufacturers to compete for market share by continually lowering their prices.

The end result? Cheaper, more advanced drugs and more choices for American patients.

The U.S. is a pharmaceutical powerhouse. Our drug companies invest about one-fifth of their revenues into research and development, more than any other industry does. Developing a new drug is an expensive endeavor. On average, it costs $2.87 billion and takes more than a decade of hard work. The burden of paying for this research and development falls disproportionately on Americans. According to a 2018 report by the Council of Economic Advisers, an agency within the executive branch, the U.S. market funds nearly half of the world’s medical research and development.

Many countries, especially ones…

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Meet the Rebate, the New Villain of High Drug Prices

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Meet the Rebate, the New Villain of High Drug Prices

An increasingly popular culprit in the debate over high drug prices is the pharmaceutical rebate, the after-the-fact discounts that form the heart of the nation’s arcane — many would say broken — market for prescription drugs.

Now, a growing chorus wants to get rid of them, or at least change the way they are applied after drug companies have already set their prices. Rebates, critics say, have pushed up the list price of brand-name drugs, which consumers are increasingly responsible for paying. Insurers generally get to keep the rebates without passing them along to their members.

Last week, the drug industry’s largest trade group, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, took aim at the rebate system, proposing a change to the way middlemen handle rebates, and how those companies are paid.

And the Trump administration has taken the first step toward eliminating a “safe-harbor” provision that allows rebates to be paid in Medicare’s Part D drug program without violating federal anti-kickback laws.

The details, though sparse, briefly caused the fall of the stocks of major pharmacy benefit managers like Express Scripts and CVS Health as investors worried that company profits would be hurt by the rebate’s demise.

Here’s a…

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Roche Takes Drug-Price Posturing to New Heights

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Roche Takes Drug-Price Posturing to New Heights

Drug companies are falling over themselves with plans to halt or defer price increases to get on Donald Trump’s good side. They seem to believe his approval comes cheap.

Pfizer Inc. started things off earlier this month by agreeing to roll back mid-year price hikes and delay them — for a few months. Similar efforts announced this week by Novartis AG and Merck & Co. arguably won’t be any more consequential. But Roche Holding AG takes the cake by promising to not raise prices for the rest of 2018, shortly after it hiked prices for the second time this year on its biggest drugs.

In a statement Friday, the Swiss pharmaceutical giant said it told the Health and Human Services Department on July 11 that it wouldn’t enact any more price hikes in 2018. The full statement is appended below.

The thing about it is, Roche had just passed along price hikes on nine drugs, including the biggest medicines in its portfolio, at the beginning of July.

Based on its recent practice, the next time Roche would likely raise prices on the drugs — Rituxan, Herceptin, Avastin, Perjeta, and Actemra, accounting for more than 60 percent of its drug sales — would be the beginning of next year, according to data from Bloomberg Intelligence and First Databank. In other words, Roche promised…

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Why Competition Won’t Bring Down Drug Prices

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Why Competition Won’t Bring Down Drug Prices

Martin Shkreli is in prison, but Daraprim still costs $750 per pill. Heather Bresch was hauled before Congress, but EpiPens still cost three to six times more than they did in 2007. Every week we hear of a new outrageous drug price hike. In polls, some 80 percent of Americans say that government should do more to curb drug prices.

Having proclaimed just before his inauguration that drug makers were “getting away with murder,” President Trump last month issued a 50-point blueprint to bring down prices, mainly by injecting more competition — and a dose of public shaming — into the market.

Though the document was light on specifics (containing more than 130 questions), the blueprint included proposals for speeding the development and sale of generics, increasing insurers’ negotiating clout, and making pricing more transparent.

The administration apparently hopes that, with a nudge and prod, the market will control pharmaceutical pricing excesses. If history is a guide, it won’t.

Competition may work well to affect the prices of baguettes and cars. But it has proved to have limited impact on American health care, especially when it comes to expensive interventions like prescription drugs.

Exhibit A would be Novartis’s cancer drug…

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Roche & Saed Charity hold awareness workshop about multiple sclerosis disease

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Roche & Saed Charity hold awareness workshop about multiple sclerosis disease

In conjunction with the World Multiple Sclerosis Day, 2018, Saed Charity for supporting MS patients has recently set up in Dammam a 2-day Symposium for Community Awareness about Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and how to deal it. The symposium was organized by Roche Saudi Arabia, a leading healthcare company which provides all kinds of psychological, social, health and financial support to patients who are suffering from the disease, in addition to building partnerships with associations, governmental institutions and other stakeholders to achieve their goal in serving patients of the disease. The Symposium has been conducted by Francois Meurgey, Senior Associate at Management Centre Europe (MCE).

Speaking on the occasion, Dr. Mohammed Al Gharib, General Manager, Roche Saudi Arabia, said: These events and initiatives play a key role in helping patients and their families to understand their rights and responsibilities and to help them explore health care experience properly”. Dr. Al Gharib told that role of supporting groups for patients is very important in building capacity and leadership among the patients.”

“We are making all possible efforts in partnership with health and charitable organizations to provide complete support for MS patients to help them cope with the disease and to provide them…

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